Language

The language used by George W. Bush in his 9/11 Address to the Nation can be described as straightforward and clear – it is easy to follow thanks to short sentences and easy to remember thanks to vivid imagery and concise ide…

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Choice of words

Bush's language is generally formal, which is appropriate for the speech and its circumstances.

He frequently uses words that create contrast between the profoundly negative effects of the terrorist attacks on the American people and the strength of the American spirit.

Some relevant examples of negative words are: “evil, despicable acts” , “disbelief, terrible sadness” , “ou…

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Sentence structure

In his speech, Bush mainly uses short and medium-length sentences. This helps him deliver his message in an effective way. For example, he states that the attacks were meant to cause chaos and …

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Tone

George W. Bush’s overall tone when he delivers the speech is serious and determined. In the video of the speech, we can observe that he emphasizes certain ideas by opening his hands towards the camera, which underlines the importance of the statements he is making. For example, this gesture can be observed at the beginning of the speech, when he…

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Symbols

In his speech, George W. Bush uses two very important symbols: the American spirit and the symbol of a higher power.

First, the speaker states that terrorist attacks cannot “touch the foundation of America” or “dent the steel of American resolve.” . Furthermore, he claims that America was attacked because it is “the brightest beacon for freedom and opportunity in the world…

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