Language

The language of the short story “Greyhound Tragedy” by Richard Brautigan is simple and minimalist, making the text easy to follow and understand. The choice of words is related to movies, small-town life, and marriage, reflecting aspects of 1930s society in the US.

The language is often ironical and satirical, suggesting that the story is meant to criticize the aspects that it conveys (frivolity, status-pride, Hollywood culture): “A few times she even got dizzy and had to sit down. It never dawned on her that she could have called on the telephone.” ; “Her mother's memo…

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Similes

A series of similes are used to describe the characters and their perspectives.  The simile “Time was running out like the popcorn at a Clark Gable picture”  creates humor and helps convey the protagonist’s perspective on time. Because her life is focused on movie stars, even the rapid passage of time is associated with eating popcorn which seems to run out quickly during a long mo…

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Metaphors

Three instances of metaphorical language stand out in the story. In the first line of the story, the protagonist’s ideal life is described as a “movie magazine tragedy” followed by an example: “She wanted her life to be a movie magazine tragedy like the death of a young star…”. The metaphor helps convey the character’s inclination for…

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Repetition

The most important repetitions in the text are those of the word ‘movie’ (6 times) and the phrase ‘the bus station’ (9 times). Both repetitions are meant to convey what the protagonist thinks about most. The…

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